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Calling All Aspiring Educators

 Aspiring Educators
NEA-NH can assist you on your journey to become a teacher
. We provide resources to help your planning and build your classroom, networking with other educators, and legal protection when you step into a classroom.   Learn more about the NEA Aspiring Educators Program 

NEA President’s Letter to Secretary Duncan

NEA President Lily Eskelsen-Garcia sent a letter to Secretary Duncan this morning outlining NEA’s ask for an opportunity dashboard within ESEA.  This is a huge priority for NEA for the next reauthorization of ESEA.  “When half of American children are now living in low-income families, I believe we have more than just the fierce urgency of now to act. I believe we have a crisis of opportunity to solve,” the letter says.   January 26, 2015 The Honorable Arne Duncan Secretary of Education 400 Maryland Avenue SW LBJ Education Building,

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Classroom Expense Deduction (REPAY) Passes House

WASHINGTON, DC—Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter (NH-01) is pleased to announce that the Classroom Expense Deduction was included in a bipartisan package that passed the House today by a vote of 378-46. “I am very happy that when teachers file their taxes next year, they’ll have this modest recognition of the financial sacrifices they make for our kids,” said Shea-Porter. Last October, Shea-Porter introduced H.R.3318, the Reimburse Educators who Pay for Academic Year (REPAY) Supplies Act, and built an active coalition of 68 bipartisan cosponsors. Throughout 2014, she led bipartisan letters and

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Teacher Time

Peter Greene Teacher, writer, blogger at curmudgucation Every profession measures time differently. Doctors and lawyers measure time in hours or vague lumps. Teachers measure time in minutes, even seconds. If a doctor (or his office) tell you that something is going to happen “at nine o’clock,” that means sometime between 9:30 and noon. Lawyers, at least in my neck of the woods, can rarely be nailed down to an actual time. Anything that’s not a scheduled appointment is “sometime this afternoon.” Even a summons to jury duty will list a particular time which just represents the approximate time at which things will start to prepare to begin happening. Further up the Relaxed Time Scale, we find the delivery and installation guys for whom “Between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Tuesday,”

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